Friday, 4 December 2009

Worlds Cheapest Michelin Star Restaurant - Tim Ho Wan Dim Sum, Hong Kong

Are you a bit of a cheap skate? Tired of paying 'bling-bling' to wine and dine your 'Hoochie Mama' in Hong Kong, just so you can get a bit of nookie tonight? You could get professional 'takeout' in the Wan Chai red light district for the price of an appetiser in some restaurants here.  Well - GOOD NEWS, my friend as I have got the perfect place for you!


Tell your 'Gold Digger' Hoochie Mama you are bringing her to a 'Michelin Star' restaurant' and watch as she salivates about champagne and caviar and visualizes pretentious twats in Armani and Gucci.  Before you arrive, tell her she can have anything on the menu and double or triple  portions if she so desires. This might be the opportune moment to grab that piece of 'quickie' nookie pronto as although the queue / line is long and the place is actually and REALLY rated a Michelin Star restaurant you will be paying an average price per dish of just u$d1.30 and the most expensive dish is u$d5 and a 'bottle of bubbly' is in fact just fizzy water!




Full article and link below

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Article Link



A HOLE-IN-THE-WALL canteen in Hong Kong that offers dishes for less than $1.50 has become the world's cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant.
Tim Ho Wan, which means Add Good Luck, can seat only 20 people in its steamy dining room where battered bamboo baskets of dim sum sell for as little as $1.42.
In other Michelin-ranked restaurants a meal can cost more than $400.
Michelin guide director Jean-Luc Naret said it was the ''most affordable starred restaurant in the world''.
The star ratings, which range from one star to three, are a rare honour in the restaurant trade, with only a few hundred in the world deemed good enough.
Tim Ho Wan is headed by Mak Pui Gor, the former dim sum chef at Hong Kong's Four Seasons Hotel, where he worked at its three-starred restaurant Lung King Heen.
During the economic crisis, Mr Mak branched out on his own to offer his dishes at bargain prices.
His most expensive dish, a plate of noodles, costs the equivalent of about $5.40, and he sells about 750 of his signature crispy pork buns each day.
At lunchtimes, diners can expect queues of up to an hour on the street outside the canteen.
''Since the news broke, we've been really very busy,'' said a waitress. ''We really are very cheap, but I don't think we are planning to raise our prices.''

Cheers to cuz Brendan for passing the link along


Tags: ..Worlds Cheapest Michelin Star Restaurant - Tim Ho Wan Dim Sum, Hong Kong..


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7 comments:

Thriftcriminal December 04, 2009 11:58 am  

Sounds tasty. Is she sitting on an air conditioner? She's also tasty.

nick December 05, 2009 4:02 am  

Good for him, providing decent food at realistic prices. When you see the price of a bog-standard dish in some fancy restaurants, you wonder how they have the nerve to charge it, and how people can be gullible enough to pay.

Goodness, air-conditioning engineers look a bit different these days....

Quickroute December 05, 2009 5:56 am  

@ Thrifty: Yes and I believe she's full of hot air

@ Nick: - yes - i'd rather see that than a plumbers crack

Stevo December 05, 2009 6:57 am  

There's a restaurant in HK more affordable than McDs? I'm aghast, in a good way. I usually have to save up before visiting Hong Kong if I hope to eat more than random cockroaches or fast food.

Baino December 05, 2009 4:24 pm  

You just had to put some skin in there didn't you? Missing the SA Samba dancers a little? Love some Dim Sum Yum Cha

Quickroute December 06, 2009 5:54 am  

@ Stevo: yeah if you dig deep there are bargains to be found

@ Baino: I thought the pic would add a little 'spice'

Totally Spain December 13, 2009 11:20 pm  

If she is serving the dim sum I'd gladly pay $$$$$$$

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